Friday, July 31, 2009

Suu Kyi verdict postponement August 11

Ms Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy won elections in 1988 but was never allowed to take power.Army-ruled Myanmar called it will hold a referendum on a new constitution in May followed by elections in 2010, Postponement of verdict was aimed at deflecting pressure after last year’s crackdown on protesters and August 8 is the 21st anniversary calling for democratic reform in the country.

Aung San Suu Kyi has spent almost 14 of the last 20 years in detention.Many are opinion that this trial is a ploy by the regime to keep the Nobel Laureate locked up until after elections scheduled for 2010.Burmese court scheduled to deliver a verdict in the high-profile trial of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi has said it is not yet ready to make a decision and adjourned until August 11, according to diplomats.The 64-year-old Nobel Peace Prize laureate is charged with violating the terms of her house arrest by harbouring an American man who swam to her house uninvited.She faces up to five years in prison.

August is an historic month in Burma’s pro-democracy movement. Twenty-one years ago, millions of Burmese took to the streets to demonstrate, calling for democratic reform in the country, August 8 is the 21st anniversary of the 1988pr uising.

On Thursday, the junta arrested about 20 Suu Kyi supporters in their homes in an overnight operation in Rangoon.The United States and the European Union have said they will push for tougher sanctions on the military government if Suu Kyi is sentenced to prison.Officials in Napyidaw reportedly contacted the Burmese Supreme Court by telephone on Friday and ordered a delay in announcing the verdict.

The postponement comes as the military government faces growing international and internal pressure over the trial of Suu Kyi, who faces up to five years in prison if found guilty of violating the terms of her house arrest.

“The verdict has been postponed to 10 am on August 11,” Nyan Win, Suu Kyi’s lawyer, told The Irrawaddy on Friday morning. Some diplomats were allowed to observe the brief court session, said sources.

Last week,U.S. President Barack Obama asked Burma's military government to free Democratic opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi from detention immediately and without conditions.A statement issued by the White House Mr. Obama condemned her continued house arrest. He said her current trial on charges of violating the terms of her house arrest is a "show trial based on spurious charges."

UN Secretary General said,last fornight,it is now up to the military junta in Myanmar to set in place the process for a credible and legitimate election in the country."It is now up to the leaders of Myanmar to set in place the elements necessary for the election to be credible and legitimate," Ban Ki-moon said at a press conference in Geneva.

U.N. Permanent Representative of Myanmar, U Than Swe, told the Security Council, "At the request of the secretary-general, the Myanmar government is processing to grant amnesty to prisoners on humanitarian grounds and with a view to enabling them to participate in the 2010 general elections." But offered no specifics beyond his statement.

Thursday, July 30, 2009

Burma rubies banned in US,EU,Australia

Burma rubies banned in US,EU,Australia
2009-07-30 06:46:04 - Gems industry still in news in Burma despite severe economic deterioration, Burma produces one of the world’s most expensive rubies.Though countries including the US, the European Union, Australia, Canada and New Zealand have slapped sanctions on Burma's gems, some Asian nations continue to buy them.

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton last week, during regional security talks in Thailand’s resort Island of Phuket, called on the Burmese junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi saying if the regime releases her, it would help US reinvest in the impoverished country.

President of the United States Barack Obama on Tuesday renewed sanctions against military-ruled Burma, including banning
of sales and import of Burmese gems into the US. With a news brief White House statement on Tuesday said, President Obama has signed the bill into law, which received overwhelming support of the Congress. The law imposes a ban on all imports from Burma for the next three years.

“On July 28, 2009, the President signed into law: H.J. Res. 56, which renews import restrictions contained in the Burmese Freedom and Democracy Act of 2003,” the White House statement said.The sanctions were due to expire this week.

Obama’s renewal of sanctions against the Burmese military regime comes after the Burmese junta on Tuesday said that a verdict on the trial of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi would be pronounced on Friday.

Aung San Suu Kyi, charged for violating her detention law, could face up to five years in prison if found guilty.

Author:

Monday, July 20, 2009

New Asian Order: US Hillary way

New Asian order: US Hillary way


20.07.2009 07:57:07 Hillary Clinton with her first Public appearance in India to establish Asian order here mere talk in Gurgaon giving bashing orders to India to reduce carbon emission norms look in tone of police officer asking the sovereign Indian government to follow the global norms to which She heads as the chief officer.Indian peoples are taken aback with such attitude of US Leaders making the statement in inimical style causing more harm to friendly ties which needs more sane diction and wordings.US efforts to bully India on Greehouse gas embission has given bad publicity to US in making firendly terms with India. India has categorically stated that it will not accept any legallybinding reductions in green house gas emissions.Young Union minister showed his maturity and put up his subject in
balance way with touch of responsibiliy of statesmanship.

(live-PR.com) - Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh said that New Delhi is not running away from its responsibilities and it has already launched a national plan to tackle the problem. Mr. Ramesh, flanked by the US Secretary of State Ms. Hillary Clinton, was talking to media persons after attending a conclave on Climate Change at Gurgaon. The Minister
asserted that India’s per capita emissions


will never exceed that of the developed countries. The Environment Minister agreed with Ms.Clinton that it is possible for the developed and developing countries to narrow their positions on climate change. He reiterated that India is willing to hold negotiations under the UN framework on climate
change. The framework exempts developing countries from taking any emission cuts while seeking such cut from the developed countries. He said the two countries have agreed on concrete partnerships in the area of energy efficiency during the discussions he had with Ms.Clinton. Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Robert Blake said on July 15 that in India the secretary hopes to “broaden and strengthen the strategic partnership” between the United States and India,as well as highlight ongoing cooperation between Indians and Americans outside of government, in areas such as business, science and academia. Secretary Clinton and her Indian counterpart, External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna, may be in a position to announce an agreement that allows U.S. companies to sell two nuclear reactors to India.

US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton’s from Monday onwards means business the United States looks forward to a broader engagement with India on global challenges such as climate change and nonproliferation.

Following stops in Mumbai and Delhi, Clinton’s July 17–23 trip will also take her to Thailand, where she will meet with her counterparts in the Association of Southeast
Asian Nations (ASEAN).Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs Robert Blake said July 15 that in India the secretary hopes to “broaden and strengthen the strategic partnership” between the United States and India, as well as highlight ongoing cooperation between Indians and Americans outside of government, in areas such as business, science and academia.

The United States and India are working on a monitoring agreement that would improve military-to-military cooperation and allow U.S. businesses to sell sensitive military equipment and technology to India. Under the agreement, the United States would be able to ensure that armaments it sells to India will be used as intended and the technology would not be leaked to third countries.“We hope to be able to sign that,” Blake said.
On July 20, Clinton and Krishna will announce “the elements of our new partnership,” Blake said. “Broadly speaking, what we’re going to do is continue the successful cooperation we’ve had on things like defense cooperation, counterterrorism, trade, while also forging new initiatives on things like agriculture, education, science and technology, and women’s empowerment.”

The civil nuclear agreement between the two countries remains “very much on track,” Blake said. In either July or August, India and the United States will likely begin talks on reprocessing uranium after India has filed a declaration of its safeguarded nuclear facilities with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

On climate change, the assistant secretary said both countries have been consulting on the United Nations climate change meeting scheduled for Copenhagen, Denmark, in December. The Indians have a chance to leapfrog older technologies and “adopt a clean-energy, low-carbon future,” Blake said.

Secretary Clinton will head the U.S. delegation to ASEAN’s regional forum in Phuket, Thailand, after meeting with Thai officials in Bangkok. U.S. Ambassador for ASEAN Affairs Scot Marciel said that along with regional concerns over North Korea’s nuclear and missile activity, the forum will also provide an opportunity to discuss climate change, pandemic flu, and political repression in Burma.Thai Foreign Ministry, official Virasakdi Futrakul,chaired a working dinner on Saturday of ASEAN senior officials,told media that the officials discussed the plan during the meeting. Virasakdi said the plan will get approval from ASEAN foreign ministers who are scheduled to officially begin series of annual meetings on Monday on the southern Thai resort island of Phuket.

ASEAN foreign ministers schedule to begin series of annual meetings on Monday on the southern Thai resort island of Phuket.Indonesian Foreign Ministry Secretary General Imron Cotan said, "We have agreed to propose to our foreign ministers to issue a statement basically portraying that ASEAN countries are united to confront this act of terrorism." According to Virasakdi, the statement will say, "We condemn the act of terrorism that cause loss of innocent lives and urge the authorities to bring the culprits to justice." "We express the solidarity in supporting the Indonesian government and that ASEAN will remain steadfast in countering acts of terrorism in all manifestations," he added.

ASEAN officials were shocked by the tragic explosions which occurred at the tightly secured hotels, according to Virasakdi.Thailand has reinforced security in Phuket, which hosts some 1,000 delegates from the 10 ASEAN countries and 16 other countries for the annual meetings.More than 10,000 forces have been deployed after Thailand enacted an internal security act to quell antigovernment demonstrators.

Prohibitory act orders no demonstrations in the neighborhood of the meeting venue, covering six sub-districts of Thalang and the Kathu district of Phuket.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made no mention of Burma in her foreign policy speech in Washington this week, but she renewed the US offer to talk with the Iranian regime but the offer and opportunity would not remain indefinitely, she warned.Clinton is on her way to Asia this is her second trip to attend the 42th Asean Ministerial Meeting in Phuket. Whether she wants it or not, the Burma and North Korea issues will likely dominate the meeting. Clinton, who said she was deeply troubled by the decision by the Burmese regime to charge Suu Kyi with a baseless crime, is not unprepared to speak on the Burma issue, but a US policy review on Burma that began in February is still pending.US State Department officials said they expected the showdown over North Korea over its nuclear and missile tests and political repression in Myanmar to be among the leading topics that Clinton will discuss when she arrives.During her first trip to Jakarta, Clinton said, “Clearly, the path we have taken in imposing sanctions hasn’t influenced the Burmese junta.” Then she added that the policy adopted by neighboring countries of “reaching out and trying to engage them has not influenced them, either.”The policy review on Burma is still pending, with the Obama administration wanting to take a different policy direction on Burma from the previous Bush administration. US new policy will probably be a mix of carrots and sticks, but recent events have complicated apparent indications favoring increased diplomacy and outreach from Washington towards Burma’s rulers.

Suu Kyi’s bizarre trial has played a role in the policy review other sensitive issues include the release of 2,100 political prisoners, the relationship with ethnic groups along the Burmese border with China and Thailand, and the upcoming election in 2010 then no doubt the issue of Burma’s shady relationship with North Korea will also play a part.

Though Washington’s policy review remains incomplete, the US is not without a policy and diplomatic tools. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Scot Marciel, assured that Clinton would bring up the issue of Burma during the meeting with Asean foreign ministers.“I don't want to try to predict exactly what Clinton going to say. I'm confident that she will raise Burma and express our concerns quite clearly,” Marciel said.

Secretary Clinton will head the U.S. delegation to ASEAN’s regional forum in Phuket, Thailand, after meeting with Thai officials in Bangkok. U.S. Ambassador for ASEAN Affairs Scot Marciel said that along with regional concerns over North Korea’s nuclear and missile activity, the forum will also provide an opportunity to discuss climate change, pandemic flu, and political repression in Burma.

Marciel said the Obama administration’s review of its Burma policy is ongoing, and has been slowed by the military government’s recent arrests of opposition activists and the trial of National League for Democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. But he said the U.S. policy of promoting progress in Burma remains unchanged.

“By progress, I mean the beginning of a dialogue between the government and the opposition and the ethnic minority groups, release of political prisoners and improved governance and, we would hope, more of an opening to the international community,” he said.

In Phuket, Clinton will also hold a four-way meeting with the foreign ministers of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia to discuss Mekong River issues such as health and the environment. “This will be the first time that a secretary of state’s done such a meeting,” Marciel said.

Foreign ministers from the other five parties the US, Russia, China, Japan and South Korea will all be in Phuket.

ASEAN's conspicuous member Myanmar since joining the bloc in 1997, showed its defiance earlier this month by refusing to allow UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to visit the opposition icon when he visited.ASEAN foreign ministers are further set to endorse a final version of the bloc's new human rights body, which has faced criticism for being unable to tackle persistent violators such as Myanmar.
Media agenies


Author:
Naresh Sagar
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Web: http://www.Nksagar.com
Phone: 9810974027

Sunday, July 19, 2009

Hillary Clinton to address Asean FM meet in Phuket

Thai Foreign Ministry, official Virasakdi Futrakul,chaired a working dinner of ASEAN senior officials,told media that the officials discussed the plan during the meeting. Virasakdi said the plan will get approval from ASEAN foreign ministers who are scheduled to officially begin series of annual meetings on Monday on the southern Thai resort island of Phuket.

ASEAN foreign ministers schedule to begin series of annual meetings on Monday on the southern Thai resort island of Phuket.Indonesian Foreign Ministry Secretary General Imron Cotan said, "We have agreed to propose to our foreign ministers to issue a statement basically portraying that ASEAN countries are united to confront this act of terrorism." According to Virasakdi, the statement will say, "We condemn the act of terrorism that cause loss of innocent lives and urge the authorities to bring the culprits to justice." "We express the solidarity in supporting the Indonesian government and that ASEAN will remain steadfast in countering acts of terrorism in all manifestations," he added.

ASEAN officials were shocked by the tragic explosions which occurred at the tightly secured hotels, according to Virasakdi.Thailand has reinforced security in Phuket, which hosts some 1,000 delegates from the 10 ASEAN countries and 16 other countries for the annual meetings.More than 10,000 forces have been deployed after Thailand enacted an internal security act to quell antigovernment demonstrators.

Prohibitory act orders no demonstrations in the neighborhood of the meeting venue, covering six sub-districts of Thalang and the Kathu district of Phuket.

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made no mention of Burma in her foreign policy speech in Washington this week, but she renewed the US offer to talk with the Iranian regime—but the offer and opportunity would not remain indefinitely, she warned.
Clinton is on her way to Asia—this is her second trip—to attend the 42th Asean Ministerial Meeting in Phuket. Whether she wants it or not, the Burma and North Korea issues will likely dominate the meeting. Clinton, who said she was deeply troubled by the decision by the Burmese regime to charge Suu Kyi with a baseless crime, is not unprepared to speak on the Burma issue, but a US policy review on Burma that began in February is still pending.US State Department officials said they expected the showdown over North Korea over its nuclear and missile tests and political repression in Myanmar to be among the leading topics that Clinton will discuss when she arrives.
During her first trip to Jakarta, Clinton said, “Clearly, the path we have taken in imposing sanctions hasn’t influenced the Burmese junta.” Then she added that the policy adopted by neighboring countries of “reaching out and trying to engage them has not influenced them, either.”The policy review on Burma is still pending, with the Obama administration wanting to take a different policy direction on Burma from the previous Bush administration. The new policy will probably be a mix of carrots and sticks, but recent events have complicated apparent indications favoring increased diplomacy and outreach from Washington towards Burma’s rulers.
Suu Kyi’s bizarre trial has played a role in the policy review—other sensitive issues include the release of 2,100 political prisoners, the relationship with ethnic groups along the Burmese border with China and Thailand, and the upcoming election in 2010—then no doubt the issue of Burma’s shady relationship with North Korea will also play a part.

Though Washington’s policy review remains incomplete, the US is not without a policy and diplomatic tools. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Scot Marciel, assured that Clinton would bring up the issue of Burma during the meeting with Asean foreign ministers.

“I don't want to try to predict exactly what she's [Clinton] going to say. I'm confident that she will raise Burma and express our concerns quite clearly,” Marciel said.

Secretary Clinton will head the U.S. delegation to ASEAN’s regional forum in Phuket, Thailand, after meeting with Thai officials in Bangkok. U.S. Ambassador for ASEAN Affairs Scot Marciel said that along with regional concerns over North Korea’s nuclear and missile activity, the forum will also provide an opportunity to discuss climate change, pandemic flu, and political repression in Burma.

Marciel said the Obama administration’s review of its Burma policy is ongoing, and has been slowed by the military government’s recent arrests of opposition activists and the trial of National League for Democracy leader and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi. But he said the U.S. policy of promoting progress in Burma remains unchanged.

“By progress, I mean the beginning of a dialogue between the government and the opposition and the ethnic minority groups, release of political prisoners and improved governance and, we would hope, more of an opening to the international community,” he said.

In Phuket, Clinton will also hold a four-way meeting with the foreign ministers of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia to discuss Mekong River issues such as health and the environment. “This will be the first time that a secretary of state’s done such a meeting,” Marciel said.

Foreign ministers from the other five parties the US, Russia, China, Japan and South Korea will all be in Phuket.

ASEAN's conspicuous member Myanmar since joining the bloc in 1997, showed its defiance earlier this month by refusing to allow UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon to visit the opposition icon when he visited.ASEAN foreign ministers are further set to endorse a final version of the bloc's new human rights body, which has faced criticism for being unable to tackle persistent violators such as Myanmar.

Railways managed to hold it good despite Diwali rush, says RailYatri.in

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