Skip to main content

USA SC:No challenge to FISA

 

United States Supreme Court will not let Americans challenge a provision in a foreign intelligence law that lets the federal government secretly eavesdrop on the intimate communications of millions of Americans.
On Tuesday, the top justices in the US said the country’s highest court will not hear a case in which Amnesty International and a slew of co-plaintiffs have contested a provision of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA, that lets the National Security Agency silently monitor emails and phone calls [.pdf].
 
Under the FISA Amendments Act of 2008 (FAA), the NSA is allowed to conduct electronic surveillance on any US citizen as long as they are suspected of conversing with any person located outside of the United States. That provision was scheduled to expire at the end of 2012, but Congress voted to re-up the bill and it was put back on the books for another five years.
 
Along with human rights workers and journalists, Amnesty International first challenged the FAA on the day it went into effect, arguing that the powers provided to the NSA under the FISA amendments likely puts the plaintiffs and perhaps millions of other Americans at risk of surveillance. Now years later, though, they are finally being told that they cannot challenge the law that, while meant to collect foreign intelligence, puts every person in the country at risk of being watched.
 
“Under the FAA, the government can target anyone — human rights researchers, academics, attorneys, political activists, journalists — simply because they are foreigners outside the United States, and in the course of its surveillance it can collect Americans’ communications with those individuals,” the American Civil Liberties Union wrote on behalf of the plaintiffs in a legal brief filed last year with the court.
 
Amnesty, et al have been pursuing an injunction against the NSA in their lawsuit, which names former NSA-Chief James Clapper is a co-defendant. Because the plaintiffs cannot prove that they’ve actually been targeted under the FAA, however, the case is been stalled endlessly.
 
In last year’s filing, the ACLU acknowledged that an appeals court panel agreed in 2011 that “plaintiffs have good reason to believe that their communications, in particular, will fall within the scope of the broad surveillance that they can assume the government will conduct,” and the full body of US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit later refused the government’s attempts to have them reconsider.
 
“But instead of allowing the case to be heard on the merits, the Obama administration asked the Supreme Court to review the case,” the ACLU’s Ateqah Khaki, wrote. “Our brief urges the Court to affirm the appeals court’s decision.”
 
On Tuesday, however, the Supreme Court dismissed the claims that the plaintiffs were being watched under the FAA. Amnesty and others had argued that the presumed surveillance they were subjected to has caused them to go out of their way to maintain working relationships with clients, forcing them to travel abroad to communicate without the fear of being monitored.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Dear N.K, Over the past few weeks and months,March 2, 2017 Dear N.K, Over the past few weeks and months, we’ve been hard at work in inviting major rail operators to share their success stories at the Rail Power World Congress 2017. I would like to share with you the progress of the premium conferences. We’ve confirmed amazing names like Auckland Transport, Network Rail, RTA Dubai, SNCF, Wiener Linien and more. If you provide energy or power solutions to rail operators and would like to speak alongside senior rail executives, this is the right platform for you. Last 2 speaking slots left in the Rail Power World Congress track for solutions providers
AirAsia launches Travel & Service Centre in MaldivesMay 22, 2016
AirAsia launches Travel & Service Centre in Maldives Exclusive promotion available only at Maldives ATSC with 20% discount to selected AirAsia & AirAsia X destinations

MALE, 22 MAY 2016 – AirAsia strengthened its presence in the paradise islands of Maldives with the launch of the first AirAsia Travel & Service Centre (ATSC) today, which is operated by All H Maldives Private Limited.
The centre was officiated by Honourable Mr Moosa Zameer, Minister of Tourism Maldives; Mr Hussain Jaleel, CEO of Civil Aviation Maldives; Mr Ibrahim Shareef Mohamed, Commissioner General of Customs Maldives; Mr Adil Moosa, Managing Director of Maldives Airports Company; Mr Abdullah Rasheed, Director Air Transport Maldives Civil Aviation Authority along with Ms Aireen Omar, CEO of AirAsia Berhad.
In conjunction with the launch of this ATSC, AirAsia is offering an exclusive promotion with 20% discount off selected AirAsia and AirAsia …